Philosophical Skepticism Wikipedia

Philosophical skepticism - Wikipedia.

Philosophical skepticism (UK spelling: scepticism; from Greek ?????? skepsis, "inquiry") is a family of philosophical views that question the possibility of knowledge. Philosophical skeptics are often classified into two general categories: Those who deny all possibility of knowledge, and those who advocate for the suspension of judgment due to the inadequacy of evidence..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophical_skepticism.

Skepticism - Wikipedia.

As a philosophical school or movement, skepticism arose both in ancient Greece and India. In India the Ajnana school of philosophy espoused skepticism. It was a major early rival of Buddhism and Jainism, and a possibly major influence on Buddhism.Two of the foremost disciples of the Buddha, Sariputta and Moggallana, were initially the students of the Ajnana ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skepticism.

Skepticism - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Skepticism is widely used as a method for research in science, and (with changes) in modern legal procedure. Here doubt, suspending judgement, careful investigation, testing and discussion come before any statement of facts. Sometimes the process takes years before consensus is reached. This systematic approach is called methodological ....

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skepticism.

Philosophy of perception - Wikipedia.

The philosophy of perception is concerned with the nature of perceptual experience and the status of perceptual data, in particular how they relate to beliefs about, or knowledge of, the world. Any explicit account of perception requires a commitment to one of a variety of ontological or metaphysical views. Philosophers distinguish internalist accounts, which assume that ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy_of_perception.

Hindu philosophy - Wikipedia.

It rejects supernaturalism, emphasizes materialism and philosophical skepticism, holding empiricism, perception and conditional inference as the proper source of knowledge Carvaka is an atheistic school of thought. It holds that there is neither afterlife nor rebirth, all existence is mere combination of atoms and substances, feelings and ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindu_philosophy.

Metaphysics - Wikipedia.

Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy that studies the fundamental nature of reality, the first principles of being, identity and change, space and time, causality, necessity, and possibility. It includes questions about the nature of consciousness and the relationship between mind and matter, between substance and attribute, and between potentiality and actuality..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metaphysics.

Philosophical analysis - Wikipedia.

Philosophical analysis is any of various techniques, typically used by philosophers in the analytic tradition, in order to "break down" (i.e. analyze) philosophical issues. Arguably the most prominent of these techniques is the analysis of concepts (known as conceptual analysis Method of analysis. While ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophical_analysis.

List of important publications in philosophy - Wikipedia.

Historical philosophical texts European and Islamic philosophy Ancient philosophy. Heraclitus (c. early 5th century), Fragments; Parmenides (c. early 5th century), On Nature; Plato (early period, c. 399 - c. 387 BC), Apology; Plato (early period), Crito Plato (early period), Euthyphro Plato (early period), Gorgias Plato (early period), Protagoras Plato (early transitional period, c. 387 ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_important_publications_in_philosophy.

Censorship - Wikipedia.

In 399 BC, Greek philosopher, Socrates, while defying attempts by the Athenian state to censor his philosophical teachings, was accused of collateral charges related to the corruption of Athenian youth and sentenced to death by drinking a poison, hemlock. The details of Socrates's conviction are recorded by Plato as follows. In 399 BC, Socrates went on trial and was subsequently found ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censorship.

Positivism - Wikipedia.

Positivism is an empiricist philosophical theory that holds that all genuine knowledge is either true by definition or positive--meaning a posteriori facts derived by reason and logic from sensory experience. Other ways of knowing, such as theology, metaphysics, intuition, or introspection are rejected or considered meaningless.. Although the positivist approach has been a recurrent ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Positivism.

Moral skepticism - Wikipedia.

Moral skepticism (or moral scepticism in British English) is a class of metaethical theories all members of which entail that no one has any moral knowledge. Many moral skeptics also make the stronger, modal claim that moral knowledge is impossible. Moral skepticism is particularly opposed to moral realism: the view that there are knowable and objective moral truths..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moral_skepticism.

Alvin Plantinga - Wikipedia.

Alvin Carl Plantinga (born November 15, 1932) is an American analytic philosopher who works primarily in the fields of philosophy of religion, epistemology (particularly on issues involving epistemic justification), and logic.. From 1963 to 1982, Plantinga taught at Calvin University before accepting an appointment as the John A. O'Brien Professor of Philosophy at the ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alvin_Plantinga.

Cogito, ergo sum - Wikipedia.

The Latin cogito, ergo sum, usually translated into English as "I think, therefore I am", is the "first principle" of Rene Descartes's philosophy. He originally published it in French as je pense, donc je suis in his 1637 Discourse on the Method, so as to reach a wider audience than Latin would have allowed. It later appeared in Latin in his Principles of Philosophy, and a similar phrase also ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cogito,_ergo_sum.

Theory of forms - Wikipedia.

The theory of Forms or theory of Ideas is a philosophical theory, concept, or world-view, attributed to Plato, that the physical world is not as real or true as timeless, absolute, unchangeable ideas. According to this theory, ideas in this sense, often capitalized and translated as "Ideas" or "Forms", are the non-physical essences of all things, of which objects and matter in the physical ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_forms.

Leap of faith - Wikipedia.

The implication of taking a leap of faith can, depending on the context, carry positive or negative connotations, as some feel it is a virtue to be able to believe in something without evidence while others feel it is foolishness. It is a hotly contested theological and philosophical concept. For instance, the association between "blind faith" and religion is disputed by those with deistic ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_of_faith.

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John Locke FRS (/ l ? k /; 29 August 1632 - 28 October 1704) was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism". ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Locke.

Summa Theologica - Wikipedia.

The Summa Theologiae or Summa Theologica (transl. 'Summary of Theology'), often referred to simply as the Summa, is the best-known work of Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274), a scholastic theologian and Doctor of the Church.It is a compendium of all of the main theological teachings of the Catholic Church, intended to be an instructional guide for theology students, including ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summa_Theologica.

Republic (Plato) - Wikipedia.

The Republic (Greek: ????????, translit. Politeia; Latin: De Republica) is a Socratic dialogue, authored by Plato around 375 BC, concerning justice (??????????), the order and character of the just city-state, and the just man. It is Plato's best-known work, and has proven to be one of the world's most influential works of philosophy and political theory, both intellectually ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_(Plato).

Logical positivism - Wikipedia.

Logical positivism, later called logical empiricism, and both of which together are also known as neopositivism, was a movement in Western philosophy whose central thesis was the verification principle (also known as the verifiability criterion of meaning). This theory of knowledge asserted that only statements verifiable through direct observation or logical proof are meaningful in ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logical_positivism.

Spontaneous human combustion - Wikipedia.

Spontaneous human combustion (SHC) is the pseudoscientific concept of the combustion of a living (or recently deceased) human body without an apparent external source of ignition. In addition to reported cases, descriptions of the alleged phenomenon appear in literature, and both types have been observed to share common characteristics in terms of circumstances and the ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spontaneous_human_combustion.

Sextus Empiricus - Wikipedia.

Sextus Empiricus (Greek: ?????? ?u????????, Sextos Empeiricos; fl. mid-late 2nd century AD) was a Greek Pyrrhonist philosopher and Empiric school physician.His philosophical works are the most complete surviving account of ancient Greek and Roman Pyrrhonism, and because of the arguments they contain against the other Hellenistic philosophies, they are also a major source ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sextus_Empiricus.

Language game (philosophy) - Wikipedia.

A language-game (German: Sprachspiel) is a philosophical concept developed by Ludwig Wittgenstein, referring to simple examples of language use and the actions into which the language is woven.Wittgenstein argued that a word or even a sentence has meaning only as a result of the "rule" of the "game" being played. Depending on the context, for example, the ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Language_game_(philosophy).

Fatalism - Wikipedia.

Fatalism is a family of related philosophical doctrines that stress the subjugation of all events or actions to fate or destiny, and is commonly associated with the consequent attitude of resignation in the face of future events which are thought to be inevitable. Definition. The term "fatalism" can refer to any of the following ideas: ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatalism.

Western philosophy - Wikipedia.

Western philosophy encompasses the philosophical thought and work of the Western world.Historically, the term refers to the philosophical thinking of Western culture, beginning with the ancient Greek philosophy of the pre-Socratics.The word philosophy itself originated from the Ancient Greek philosophia (?????????), literally, "the love of wisdom" Ancient Greek: ?????? ....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_philosophy.